Saturday, November 19, 2016

Feminism Terminology

Throughout my years of studying feminism, gender, and sexuality; I have never found a terminology list that fully satisfies me. This is my attempt to make one. No list can be completely comprehensive, because everyone has their own unique way of defining themselves. However, I hope this list is a good tool for people new to these subjects.

I highly recommend reading all of the terminology before following any of the links, because you will have a much better chance of understanding said articles!


Sex:

Biological Sex: The physical structure of your body; determined by chromosomes, hormones, and anatomy. Can be male, female, or intersex.

Intersex: “A general term used for a variety of conditions in which a person is born with a reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn’t seem to fit the typical definitions of female or male” (source) (see more on this here).


Gender:

Gender Binary: The belief that there are only two distinct genders, male or female. Also includes the belief that each has their own distinct cultural roles, behavior, personality traits, and types of dress/expression, etc.; known as masculinity and femininity.

Gender Expression: Your physical presentation of masculinity or femininity.

Gender Identity: Your internal feeling of your gender.

Transgender: Someone's born biological sex does not match their gender identity. The word comes from the Latin prefix trans-, meaning “across”, “beyond”, or “through” (source).

FTM: Means “female to male”, a transgender man.

MTF: Means “male to female”, a transgender woman.

Transsexual: Someone who changes their born biological sex to better match their gender identity.

Cisgender: Someone's born biological sex matches their gender identity. The word comes from the Latin prefix cis-, meaning “on this side of” (source).

Genderqueer/Non-binary: Two umbrella terms for gender identities outside of the gender binary.

Agender/Neutral-gender/Neutrois: Used interchangeably. Means a person is without gender/no gender identity; or, a person has a gender identity, which is neutral (see more on this
here).

Androgyne: Means a person has “a gender identity that can be a blend of both or neither of the binary genders” (source).

Bigender: “Bigender people identify as two genders simultaneously, or move between them. This is not limited to man/woman and can include other genders” (source).

Trigender: A person “has three gender ientities, at the same time, or at different times” (
source).

Pangender/Omnigender: Is “a non-binary gender experience which refers to a wide multiplicity of genders that can (or not) tend to the infinite (meaning that this experience can go beyond the current knowledge of genders). This experience can be either simultaneously or over time” (source).

Demigender: Is “an umbrella term for nonbinary gender identities that have a partial connection to a certain gender” (source).

Genderfluid: A person has different gender identities at different times (see more on this here). It is not a choice, but another gender identity.

Genderflux: Is “a gender identity in which the intensity of gender varies over time” (source).


Sexuality:

Heterosexual: Someone who is sexually attracted to cisgender people of the opposite sex. Commonly called 'straight'.

Homosexual: Someone who is sexually attracted to cisgender people of the same sex. Commonly called 'gay'.

Bisexual: Someone who is sexually attracted to two different genders. The word comes from the Latin prefix bi-, meaning “two” (source).

Allosexual: Someone who is sexually attracted to others.

Asexual: Someone who is not sexually attracted to others.

Demisexual: Someone who only feels sexual attraction after an emotional bond has formed.

Grey-asexual: Someone who is between asexual and allosexual on the sexuality spectrum (see more on this here).

Polysexual: Someone who is sexually attracted to many, but not all, genders. The word comes from the Greek prefix poly-, meaning “many” or “much” (source).

Androsexual: Someone who is sexually attracted to male gendered people. This term is commonly used by genderqueer individuals. The word comes from the Greek prefix andro-, meaning “male” (source).

Gynesexual: Someone who is sexually attracted to female gendered people. This term is commonly used by genderqueer individuals. The word comes from the Greek prefix gyneco-, meaning “female” (source).

Skoliosexual: Someone who is sexually attracted to non-binary people. The word comes from the Greek prefix scolio-, meaning “bent” or “crooked” (source).

Pansexual: Someone who is sexually attracted to all genders. The word comes from the Greek prefix pan-, meaning “all” (source).

Sexually fluid: Someone who is sexually attracted to different gender identities at different times. It is not a choice, but another sexual orientation (see more on this here).


Other:

Body dysphoria: Distress/discomfort that happens because one's body does not align with their gender identity (see more on this here).

Social dysphoria: Distress/discomfort that happens because of social treatment that is based on one's perceived and inaccurate gender identity.

Attraction: Is “a feeling of being drawn to, or experiencing a pull toward, a recipient whose qualities inspire an impulse of a particular nature” (source).

Sexual attraction: You experience a sexual pull towards someone.

Romantic attraction: You experience a romantic pull towards someone. All of the different types for sexual orientation are true for romantic orientation as well (aromantic, demiromantic, etc.). There is no correlation between sexual and romantic orientation (you can be an alloromantic asexual, aromantic allosexual, aromantic asexual, etc.).

Emotional attraction: You experience an emotional pull towards someone.

Intellectual attraction: You experience an intellectual pull towards someone.

Sensual attraction: You experience a sensual (but not sexual) pull towards someone.

Aesthetic attraction: You experience an aesthetic pull towards someone or something (if you 'just really like' that shirt, that's aesthetic attraction).

Desire: Is “a strong feeling of wanting to have something or wishing for something to happen” (source). In other words, it's “the degree of will directed toward action” (source). You can desire any type of 'attraction' experience above (sexual, romantic, intellectual, etc.) without having that attraction.

Libido/Sex Drive: Is “a physiological need for sexual activity” (source). There is a spectrum of low to high, and everyone has their own baseline. Fluctuation in someone's libido can happen for many reasons (see more on this here). There is no correlation between libido and sexual orientation (ex. you can be asexual and still have a high libido).

Sexual Desire: The psychological desire for sexual activity.

Sexual Arousal: The physiological actions of one's body. Sexual arousal can happen without sexual desire, and is often present in sexual assault and rape (see more on this here and here).

Celibate/Abstinent: The act of abstaining from sex, usually because of religious or personal views.

Sex-Averse/Repulsed Asexual: An asexual who is aversed to/repulsed by the thought of sexual activity, either in general or personally.

Sex-Indifferent Asexual: An asexual who is indifferent to the thought of sexual activity, either in general or personally.

Sex-Favorable Asexual: An asexual who is favorable to the thought of sexual activity, either in general or personally.

Romance-Averse/Repulsed Aromantic: An aromantic who is aversed to/repulsed by the thought of romance, either in general or personally.

Romance-Indifferent Aromantic: An aromantic who is indifferent to the thought of romance, either in general or personally.

Romance-Favorable Aromantic: An aromantic who is favorable to the thought of romance, either in general or personally.

Queerplatonic Relationship: A platonic relationship that is closer than a conventional friendship (see here for more information and important history on the term).

Primary Partnership: The primary relationship in one's life. Anyone can have or desire a primary partnership. It has no correlation to one's sexual or romantic orientation.

Heteronormativity: Is “a system that works to normalize behaviors and societal expectations that are tied to the presumption of heterosexuality and an adherence to a strict gender binary” (source; see more on this there).

Amatonormativity: Is “the assumption that a central, exclusive, amorous relationship is normal for humans, in that it is a universally shared goal, and that such a relationship is normative, in the sense that it should be aimed at in preference to other relationship types” (source; see more on this there).

Sex Positive: Is the belief that “the only relevant measure of a sexual act, practice, or experience is the consent, pleasure, and well-being of the people engaged in it or the people affected by it” (source; see more on this here).

Mx.: Is a gender neutral title (like Mrs., Ms., Mr., etc.) (see more on this here).

Gender Neutral and Queer Titles: Various titles for different personal relationships, here.

Preferred Gender Pronouns: There are many gender inclusive pronouns being used in the community right now. Here is an article that covers a lot of them.

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